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Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology

Michigan Technological University

Contact: John Jaszczak (jaszczak(at)mtu.edu)
Associate Director for Education and Outreach,
Multiscale Technologies Institute

Updated October 13, 2008

Click here for the original proposal.

The Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology recognizes advanced study of scientific, technological, and engineering topics in nanotechnology, including aspects of

  1. characterization
  2. micro- to nano-scale fabrication and control, and
  3. devices, systems and integration.

The certificate also requires study of the societal and ethical implications of emerging technologies.

1. Rationale

Michigan Tech has strong and growing research thrusts that deal with a broad range nanoscale science and engineering. Likewise, MTU has been moving to develop appropriate educational program in nanotechnology. While the National Academy of Sciences has advised against rushing to start new engineering and science undergraduate degree programs in nanotechnology[1], Michigan Tech has successfully developed and started an interdisciplinary minor in Nanoscale Science and Technology in fall 2005, and is planning to start a new Nanotechnology Enterprise in January 2008 with NSF funding. The new Multi-Scale Technologies Institute (MuSTI), under the direction of Craig Friedrich, serves as an umbrella organization to assist in the coordination and development of these and related research and educational efforts (http://www.me.mtu.edu/Institutes/MuSTI/). In this context, we believe that the Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology is a necessary and appropriate educational opportunity for postgraduate students that will offer them an attractive supplement to their graduate degrees in this era of rapid paced technological change. In addition to a required course on nanotechnology's societal implications, students will choose elective courses to broaden their exposure to the science and applications of nanotechnology in other disciplines, as well as to deepen their understanding in their primary areas of interest.

The Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology is designed to:

  1. deepen students' understanding of technical aspects of nanoscale science, technology, and engineering;
  2. encourage students to pursue related interdisciplinary coursework outside their major;
  3. be flexible to allow for participation by students in diverse majors;
  4. familiarize students with the real and perceived societal implications of nanotechnology and other emerging technologies, which span from economics to ethics to politics.

[1] Committee for the Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative, Division of Engineering and Physical Sciences, National Research Council. "Small Wonders, Endless Frontiers: A Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative." National Academy Press, Washington, D. C., pp. 17-19 (2002).

2. Curriculum Design:

A total of 15 credits are required for this certificate. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in each of the courses counting toward the certificate. As an interdisciplinary certificate, a maximum of 6 credits is allowed in courses at the 3000- and 4000- levels.

Required Courses:

(A) SS5820 Graduate Seminar in Societal Implications of Nanotechnology (2 credits)
(B) At least one course must be selected from the following list:

  • BE/MY 5750 Bioapplications of Nanotechnologies
  • BL 5040/BL 5050 Electron Optical Methods of Analysis I and II: Principles and Techniques for Biologists (must be selected as a pair to count toward the requirement)
  • MEEM 5640 - Micromanufacturing Processes
  • EE/MY 5430 - Electronic Materials
  • EE/MY 5460 - Solid State Devices
  • MY 4710 - Photonic Materials and Devices
  • MY 5550 - Solid Surfaces
  • PH 5530 - Selected Topics in Nanoscale Science and Technology

Elective Courses:

Students must take from the following list of approved courses at least one course from each of the three topical groups: Characterization; Fabrication and Control; and Devices, Systems, and Integration [2]. Remaining credits may be taken from any of the topical groups or the "Other Electives" group. At least 6 credits in this graduate certificate program, not counting SS 5820, must be from outside of the student's home department. Students in interdisciplinary graduate degree programs and students not seeking a graduate degree must have their selection of elective courses approved by the MuSTI Associate Director for Education and Outreach, or in the absence of such an office, by a faculty member appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. Underlined courses listed below satisfy part (B) of the "Required Courses" stipulation outlined above.

1. Characterization

  • BL 5040 - Electron Optical Methods of Analysis I: Principles and Techniques for Biologists (2)
  • BL 5050 - Electron Optical Methods of Analysis II: Principles and Techniques for Biologists (2)
  • BL 5060 - Biological Ultrastructure (4)
  • FW 5080 - Gene Profiling Analysis (2)
  • MY 4200 - Introduction to Scanning Electron Microscopy (2)
  • MY 5200 - Advanced Scanning Electron Microscopy (3)
  • MY 5250 - Transmission Electron Microscopy (3)
  • MY 5580 - Introduction to Scanning Probe Microscopy (2)

2. Fabrication and Control

  • BE 4700 - Biosensors: Fabrication and Applications (3)
  • EE 5470 - Semiconductor Fabrication (3) [co-listed with MY 5470]
  • EE 6480 - Thin Films (3) [co-listed with MY 6480]
  • MEEM 5640 - Micromanufacturing Processes (3)
  • MY 5470 - Semiconductor Fabrication (3) [co-listed with EE 5470]
  • MY 6480 - Thin Films (3) [co-listed with EE 6480]

3. Devices, Systems, and Integration

  • BE 5300 - Advanced Polymeric Biomaterials (3)
  • BE 5660 - Active Implantable Devices (3)
  • BE 5700 - Biosensors (3)
  • BE 5800 - Advanced Biomaterials Interfaces (3)
  • BE 5750 - Bioapplications of Nanotechnologies (2) [co-listed with MY 5750]
  • BL 5020 - Enzymology (3)
  • EE 5460 - Solid State Devices (3) [co-listed with MY 5460]
  • EE 5480 - Advanced MEMS (4) [co-listed with MY 5480]
  • MY 4240 - Introduction to MEMS (4)
  • MY 4240D - Introduction to MEMS (4)
  • MY 5480 - Advanced MEMS (4) [co-listed with EE 5480]
  • MY 4710 - Photonic Materials and Devices (3)
  • MY 5460 - Solid State Devices (3) [co-listed with EE 5460]
  • MY 5750 - Bioapplications of Nanotechnologies (2) [co-listed with BE 5750]

Other Electives

  • BE 5440 - Genetic Engineering (3)
  • BL 5030 - Molecular Biology (3)
  • *CH 5310 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)
  • *CH 5410 - Advanced Organic Chemistry I (3)
  • *CH 5420 - Advanced Organic Chemistry II (3)
  • CH 5509 - Environmental Organic Chemistry (3)
  • CH 5570 - Advanced Biophysical Chemistry (3)
  • EE 5430 - Electronic Materials (3) [co-listed with MY5430]
  • FW 4089 - Bioinformatics (3)
  • FW 5085 - Functional Genomics and Biotechnology (3)
  • FW 5089 - Tools of Bioinformatics (4)
  • *MY 3700 - Electronic, Optical, and Magnetic Properties of Materials (4)
  • MY 5430 - Electronic Materials (3) [co-listed with EE5430]
  • MY 5550 - Solid Surfaces (3)
  • MY 6100 - Computational Materials Science and Engineering (3)
  • *PH 3410 - Quantum Mechanics I (3)
  • *PH 3411 - Quantum Mechanics II (3)
  • *PH 5410 - Quantum Mechanics I (3)
  • *PH 5411 - Quantum Mechanics II (2)
  • PH 5510 - Theory of Solids (3)
  • PH 5520 - Materials Physics (3)
  • PH 5530 - Selected Topics in Nanotechnology (2)

Due to the rapid developments in the field of nanotechnology, other appropriate electives may be substituted upon approval of the Multi-Scale Technologies Institute's Associate Director for Education and Outreach (or in the absence of such an office, by a faculty member appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School).

*These courses may count as electives only for students not enrolled in graduate degree programs in the respective home departments for these courses; e.g. Physics M.S. and Ph.D. candidates may not count PH3410, 3411, 5410 or 5411 toward the Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology.

3. Facilities:

On campus facilities are extensive, and include:

  • Hitachi S-4700 field emission scanning electron microscope
  • Hitachi FB-200A focused ion beam system
  • JEOL JSM-6400 scanning electron microscope
  • JEOL JEM-4000FX transmission electron microscope
  • Philips XL40 environmental scanning electron microscope
  • Scintag XDS-2000 powder x-ray diffractometer
  • Scintag XDS-2000 pole figure x-ray diffractometer.
  • Philips Electronic Instruments x-ray generator and Laue method diffractometer
  • Siemens D500 powder x-ray diffractometer
  • Molecular Beam Epitaxy system
  • Wave Guide Testing Optics Bench
  • Micromanipulator
  • Microtome and polishing machine
  • Dual-RF-plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) System
  • Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) System
  • Dual-RF-plasma Pulsed-Laser Deposition (PLD) System
  • Microfabrication laboratory, etching, lithography, sputtering, evaporation and etching
  • Micromechanical machining laboratory

These and other facilities are described in more detail under http://www.nano.mtu.edu/nanofacilities.htm, http://mcff.mtu.edu/acmal/instrumentation.htm, and http://www.me.mtu.edu/Institutes/MuSTI/facilities.htm; however, these lists are by no means exhaustive.

[2] K. Cowan and Y. Gogotsi, Journal of Materials Education 26 (2004) 147-152.